Berlin 00:00:00 London 00:00:00 New York 00:00:00 Chicago 00:00:00 Los Angeles 00:00:00 Shanghai 00:00:00
members login here
Region
Country / State
City
Genre
Artist
Exhibition

Aniko Robitz

Page 1 | 2 | 3 | Biography


While Anikó Robitz uses photography as a medium, her works can be appropriately understood from the visual vantage point of fine arts. Her works can be approached with ease by those who are familiar with the novel visual vocabulary of form developed in the 20th century, which can be linked primarily to abstraction, Suprematism and Minimalism, i.e., signalling a departure from anthropocentric representation. It is a departure from all that fine art photography, addressing a main stream public with its own genres – such as landscape, still-life, genre, portrait and nude photography, etc. – all stemming from the classification of genres or approaches pertaining to traditional art forms, with their history being linked to the once-unified world view. Even though Robitz’s photos may seem to suggest at first glance that the artist is a studio photographer, the world of her works is by no means a constructed, staged world. Only the framing of the scene by the camera shows the characteristics of construction, whereas the dramatic sujet occurs out there in real life. In order for the artist to find her true field of work, she sets out – or rather takes a plane – in the manner of so many thousands of tourists, who incessantly record billions of shots, tainting the last remaining virgin spots in the world. In some sense, Robitz is also a tourist; she joins the endless row of travellers, but she is interested in something that only she is able to notice on this planet when seeing the world-famous sights. This is what makes her work unique. In addition, instead of interpreting reality as the majority of photographers do, she creates a new world out of the hidden features of the existing world. She discovers the visible in the invisible, and makes the unknown known, because she has a key that no one else possesses. No one would think that the body of images presented here have been photographed at renowned sites of metropolises and megalopolises of the world. It has a bizarre effect indeed to find the names of New York, Lisbon, Berlin, Paris, etc. beside the year on the labels of such photos. Not that the actual geographical reference would be crucial, as no recognisable motif of any kind appears in her photos. The viewer has the impression that the photos could have been taken at any place where there are geometrical forms, angles, diagonals, lines or abstract structures. At the same time, the reference to the names of cities is not only made to create an unexpected effect, but rather to make you see that New York is not merely the Statue of Liberty, Paris is not only the Eiffel Tower, and Berlin is not simply the Brandenburg Gate. The high-tech architecture of our days is also an inexhaustible source of linguistic forms; one only has to be able to find the secret and concealed details of these constructions; those details that are not made to be visible, but are intimated, lending themselves to poetic experiences of reality and to a highly sensitive mode of vision, focused on unique micro-worlds. After this brief introduction, it goes without saying that Robitz’s compositions are free from any posterior, artificial intervention; her photographs are original and unmanipulated digital shots. Each of the shown images reflects original situations, the moment’s arrest, where the artist fully respects that which she has come to recognise. Robitz teaches us a type of refined visual sensitivity, in order to make us feel free to leave our familiar ways and venture into new fields, beyond the conditioned limits of perception and approach. You can always find new trails to be dauntlessly followed towards the unknown, and the discovered unknown will reflect your soul, together with everything that has been recorded in it since you were born. You only need a few images to help you realise it and stir the buried dimensions of your existence, lying dormant in the cosmic memory inherited from our ancestors. Anikó Robitz has introduced a new mode of vision, a novel sensibility into the vein of contemporary Hungarian photography, which stems from the experience of the most beautiful poetic and linguistic developments of the past century, the modernist tradition. Without a sense of orthodoxy, she views this tradition as a living practice never seeking to settle, but always in quest for what is new, fresh, surprising and unusual. She has faith in it, yet she does not confine herself to any of its dogmatic tenets. The way is always open and never boisterous. This way is silently intimate.

Bálint Szombathy 2013


Aniko Robitz
Budapest
Hungary
Eastern Europe


T:
F:
M:
W: http://www.anikorobitz.photo




Web Links
Aniko ROBITZ
SIGN UP FOR NEWSLETTERS
Follow on Twitter

Click on the map to search the directory

USA and Canada Central America South America Western Europe Eastern Europe Asia Australasia Middle East Africa
SIGN UP for ARTIST MEMBERSHIP SIGN UP for GALLERY MEMBERSHIP